Message from the Director

Dr. Trent PetrieWelcome to the UNT Center for Sport Psychology and Performance Excellence website. I appreciate you taking this opportunity to learn more about our Center and the work we do at the university and in the community. The Center for Sport Psychology is a national leader in (a) providing services to athletes, coaches and teams, (b) educating future sport psychologists as well as current coaches and sport administrators, (c) conducting research with exercisers and sport participants, and (d) working with the community, such as youth sport programs, to make sport a more enjoyable and meaningful experience. Simply put, our mission is to help you reach your performance goals, whatever they may be, and find passion in what you do.

I encourage you to take some time to become familiar with our services and the resources that are available to you in our website. You can learn more about (a) the sport psychology services that we can provide to athletes, coaches, teams, and other performers, (b) the sport psychology educational opportunities that are available through UNT, (c) our ongoing sport psychology research projects at the university and in the community, and (d) the sport psychology resources that we have developed for athletes, coaches, teams, and parents, and made available to you in this site. If you have any questions about our work, please feel free to contact us via email (sportpsych@unt.edu) or phone 940-369-SPORT (7767). 

Center News

Dr. Trent Petrie and Center staff members (Troy Moles, Joey Ramaeker, Alexandra Thompson, Kayla Carrigan, Shelly Sheinbein, Bailey Tackett, Justine Chatterton, and Brian Yu) presented their research findings at the 2013 APA Convention that was held July 31 to August 4 in Honolulu, HI.

Dr. Trent Petrie delivered his presidential address for Division 47 (exercise and sport psychology) of the American Psychological Association at the annual convention, which was held July 31 to August 4 in Honolulu, HI.  In his speech, entitled ‘What Psychology Can Teach Us About Being A Sport Psychologist,’ Dr. Petrie argued that sport psychology has not as fully embraced current theories and empirically-supported approaches from general psychology that could be useful in the applied work that is done in the field.

The Center’s staff has published new Performance Notes, which can be found at https://sportpsych.unt.edu/resources/athletes/30.

The Center and its affiliated training program in sport psychology through the Department of Psychology’s APA-accredited Counseling Psychology program was nominated for Distinguished Contributions to Education and Training in Exercise and Sport Psychology within Division 47 (Exercise and Sport Psychology) of the American Psychological Association for 2013.  Center Director, Dr.

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